Novelists illustrate the climate futures; Updating road signs in Idaho : Here & Now Kim Stanley Robinson's science fiction has long explored the impacts of a changing climate. He's so well-regarded that he was invited to COP26 in Glasgow this week. He talks about the responsibility fiction writers have to address the climate crisis. And, road signs and historical markers are being updated in Idaho to include the voices and perspectives on Native American tribes. Author and journalist Tony Tekaroniake Evans joins us to discuss.

Novelists illustrate the climate futures; Updating road signs in Idaho

Novelists illustrate the climate futures; Updating road signs in Idaho

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Kim Stanley Robinson's science fiction has long explored the impacts of a changing climate. He's so well-regarded that he was invited to COP26 in Glasgow this week. He talks about the responsibility fiction writers have to address the climate crisis.

And, road signs and historical markers are being updated in Idaho to include the voices and perspectives on Native American tribes. Author and journalist Tony Tekaroniake Evans joins us to discuss.

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