Codifying Consent: California's New Law On 'Stealthing.' : 1A Last month, California became the first state to outlaw "stealthing" — the slang term for removing a condom during sex without consent.

Advocates say the ban could catalyze a legislative sea change and help people understand that stealthing is a form of sexual violence.

We talk with the assembly member behind the bill and a survivor about the road ahead.

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Codifying Consent: California's New Law On 'Stealthing.'

Codifying Consent: California's New Law On 'Stealthing.'

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1A listener Natalie reached out to us to talk about being a survivor of 'stealthing.' MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images

1A listener Natalie reached out to us to talk about being a survivor of 'stealthing.'

MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images

Last month, California became the first state to outlaw "stealthing" — the slang term for removing a condom during sex without consent.

Advocates say the ban could catalyze a legislative sea change and help people understand that stealthing is a form of sexual violence.

From The New York Times:

Stealthing tends to go widely unreported because there were few ways to address it legally, but it is still a widespread issue, according to advocates and research.

A study published in the National Library of Medicine in 2019 reported that 12 percent of women said that they had been a victim of stealthing. Another study that year found that 10 percent of men admitted to removing their condom during intercourse without their partner's consent.

But [attorney Alexandra] Brodsky, who wrote the 2017 Yale study and is the author of "Sexual Justice," a book that addresses various forms of institutional response to sexual harassment and assault, said last month that civil suit remedies were "really underutilized" in such cases.

Alexandra Brodsky, and Cristina Garcia join us for the conversation.

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