Scuba diver in Wisconsin finds a 1,200-year-old canoe Maritime archaeologist Tamara Thomsen was exploring Lake Mendota when she saw what might have been a log. Instead it was a 15-foot-long dugout canoe which was carved somewhere around the year 800.

Scuba diver in Wisconsin finds a 1,200-year-old canoe

Scuba diver in Wisconsin finds a 1,200-year-old canoe

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Maritime archaeologist Tamara Thomsen was exploring Lake Mendota when she saw what might have been a log. Instead it was a 15-foot-long dugout canoe which was carved somewhere around the year 800.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Earlier this year, a scuba diver exploring Lake Mendota in Wisconsin noticed what looked like a log partially buried deep underwater. Good thing Tamara Thomsen is also a maritime archaeologist. Turns out, the object is a boat - a really old one. Scientists have now determined that the 15-foot-long dugout canoe was carved somewhere around the year 800. Efforts are now underway to preserve it. Well done, Tamara Thomsen. Well done. It's MORNING EDITION.

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