The pandemic makes globalization harder : The Indicator from Planet Money Adnan Durrani loved sourcing ingredients from all over the world for his food company Saffron Road. Then the pandemic hit. Now Adnan is totally reconsidering the benefits of globalization.

Global food, local sauces

Global food, local sauces

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1054091162/1054105871" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Manjunath Kiran /AFP via Getty Images
Spices and produce are displayed for sale at a wholesale shop at the Agriculture Produce Marketing Committee (APMC) Market in the Indian city of Bangalore on September 11, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / MANJUNATH KIRAN (Photo credit should read MANJUNATH KIRAN/AFP via Getty Images)
Manjunath Kiran /AFP via Getty Images

Spices from India. Jasmine rice from Thailand. Noodles from Singapore. These are just a few examples of the ingredients the Saffron Road company sourced from around the world.

Known for its microwavable meals and other pre-packaged foods, Saffron Road was inspired by the famous Silk Road and how it connected both Eastern and Western cultures with food.

But CEO and founder Adnan Durrani found that his own silk road was shrinking as a result of supply-chain complications brought on by the pandemic. That's when Adnan decided Saffron Road could move towards local sourcing instead.

Today on the show, the costs of globalization in an age of the pandemic — and whether other companies are also reconsidering supply chains from far-flung places.