Drought And Economic Turmoil Push Afghanistan To Brink Of Hunger Catastrophe : Consider This from NPR Afghanistan is facing its worst drought in decades, but that's not the only reason it is on the verge of a hunger crisis. After the Taliban took over, much of the country's international development aid was suspended, and the United States froze $9.5 billion in Afghan government assets. The economy has plummeted.

Richard Trenchard, country director for the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization in Afghanistan, explains what he's heard from farmers and herders.

PBS NewsHour special correspondent Jane Ferguson recently returned from a reporting trip in the country, where she saw hospital wards filling up with malnourished babies and toddlers.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Half Of Afghanistan's Population Faces Acute Food Insecurity. Here's Why.

Half Of Afghanistan's Population Faces Acute Food Insecurity. Here's Why.

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Afghanistan's worst drought in decades has forced many people from their homes. HOSHANG HASHIMI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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HOSHANG HASHIMI/AFP via Getty Images

Afghanistan's worst drought in decades has forced many people from their homes.

HOSHANG HASHIMI/AFP via Getty Images

Afghanistan is facing its worst drought in decades, but that's not the only reason it is on the verge of a hunger crisis. After the Taliban took over, much of the country's international development aid was suspended, and the United States froze $9.5 billion in Afghan government assets. The economy has plummeted.

Richard Trenchard, country director for the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization in Afghanistan, explains what he's heard from farmers and herders.

PBS NewsHour special correspondent Jane Ferguson recently returned from a reporting trip in the country, where she saw hospital wards filling up with malnourished babies and toddlers.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Connor Donevan, Lauren Hodges and Kat Lonsdorf. It was edited by Fatma Tanis, Nishant Dahiya, Courtney Dorning and Christopher Intagliata. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.