Rumor has it Adele broke the vinyl supply chain : The Indicator from Planet Money We're in the midst of a vinyl boom and chains like Walmart have been cashing in. But so have stars like Adele, who reportedly pressed over 500,000 records for her new album, "30." Today on the show, has Adele really clogged the fragile vinyl supply chain, or should we go easy on her?

Rumor has it Adele broke the vinyl supply chain

Rumor has it Adele broke the vinyl supply chain

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Paul Kane/Getty Images
PERTH, AUSTRALIA - FEBRUARY 28: Adele performs at Domain Stadium on February 28, 2017 in Perth, Australia. (Photo by Paul Kane/Getty Images)
Paul Kane/Getty Images

Since 2008, record collecting has gone from an underground pastime for hipsters to a mainstream hobby for just about everyone. And big chains like Wal-Mart, and Target have helped make that transition.

For artists, pressing vinyl has become a major part of their marketing campaigns and is no longer an afterthought. So of course a star as big as Adele would press more than 500,000 records for her new album, "30."

Still, the decision is not without controversy due to the current supply chain crisis and outrageous wait times for orders. That's why some people in the indie community who helped make vinyl cool again have been in a bit of a Twitter rage saying Adele single handedly broke the vinyl supply chain.

But one record presser tells us that technological limitations and an unprecedented demand for vinyl was tangling the supply chain even before the pandemic. Today on the show, has Adele really clogged the vinyl supply chain, or should we go easy on her?

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