Despite the holiday crunch, Beanie Babies should be in the hands of customers Ty Warner, owner of the Beanie Baby brand, had trouble getting his miniature stuffed animals from Chinese factories. He booked more than 150 flights to airlift his product to his Illinois warehouse.

Despite the holiday crunch, Beanie Babies should be in the hands of customers

Despite the holiday crunch, Beanie Babies should be in the hands of customers

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Ty Warner, owner of the Beanie Baby brand, had trouble getting his miniature stuffed animals from Chinese factories. He booked more than 150 flights to airlift his product to his Illinois warehouse.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Supply chain issues even affect Beanie Babies. Ty Warner, owner of the Beanie Baby brand, had trouble getting his miniature stuffed animals out of Chinese factories so he found a holiday workaround. He booked 150 flights to airlift his product straight to his Illinois warehouse. I have so many questions like, do the Beanie Babies fly first class? And what do the flight attendants make of all this? It's MORNING EDITION.

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