Author Erik Loomis talks about the history of strikes in America : Planet Money : The Indicator from Planet Money In the wake of the "great resignation", organized labor may be having a moment in the U.S. Tens of thousands of workers have protested working conditions at companies like John Deere and Kellogg's and, in recent months, workers across the country have chosen or threatened strike action. Today on the show, author Erik Loomis shares how the history of America's unions explains today's labor movement.

The rise and fall (and rise?) of organized labor

The rise and fall (and rise?) of organized labor

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Scott Olson/Getty Images
DAVENPORT, IOWA - OCTOBER 15: At truck hauls a piece of John Deere equipment from the factory past workers picketing outside of the John Deere Davenport Works facility on October 15, 2021 in Davenport, Iowa. More than 10,000 John Deere employees, represented by the UAW, walked of the job at yesterday after failing to agree to term of a new contract. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Scott Olson/Getty Images

The pandemic has been a driving force that's caused many Americans to reevaluate their working conditions and their relationship with labor. Consequently, 2021 has witnessed the rise of a new labor movement.

Earlier this year, Google employees created their first union. These past few months, tens of thousands of workers went on strike at companies like John Deere and Kellogg's.

Today on the show, author Erik Loomis joins us to talk about his book, "A History of America in Ten Strikes" and the future of organized labor in America.

Check out past coverage of unions and strikes discussed in this episode here: