Canada's "Moderate Livelihood" ruling complicates fishing for The Mi'kmaq people : Planet Money A tense conflict between Indigenous fishermen and commercial lobstermen flared up in Nova Scotia in the fall of 2020. Today, how it all got started and how the Canadian government added fuel to the fire. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Consider the lobstermen

Consider the lobstermen

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Photo of lobster caught in the Canadian province, Nova Scotia. Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR hide caption

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Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR

Photo of lobster caught in the Canadian province, Nova Scotia.

Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR

Lobster has become Nova Scotia's largest export and the most valuable fishery in Canada. The country sells more than $2 billion of lobster every year to dinner tables across Canada, the U.S., and China. However, a simmering conflict between indigenous members of the Mi'kmaq First Nation and commercial lobstermen stemming from a centuries-old treaty has both sides asking, what is the right way to manage a fishery? How do you protect the sustainability of a fishery while also honoring a culture who has relied on fishing?

On today's episode, we travel to Nova Scotia to figure out how a group of Mi'kmaw fishermen asserted their rights to fish and what happened when commercial lobsterman struck back hard.

*This episode contains explicit language*

Music: "Guts, Glory and Guns" and "Cut Glass Stars" and "The Devil's Work"

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