Damon Albarn's latest record reflects on an evolving landscape : World Cafe : World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN A collaboration with several orchestral musicians from Reykjavík served as the foundation for Albarn's new solo album, The Nearer the Fountain, More Pure the Stream Flows.

Damon Albarn's latest record reflects on an evolving landscape

Damon Albarn on World Cafe

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Damon Albarn Linda Brownlee/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Linda Brownlee/Courtesy of the artist

Damon Albarn

Linda Brownlee/Courtesy of the artist

Set List

  • "Polaris"
  • "Royal Morning Blue"
  • "Darkness To Light"
  • "The Cormorant"

The view from Damon Albarn's home in Iceland is nothing short of stunning: a lake; mountains in the distance; a volcano; and, notably, a glacier — a glacier that's receded substantially over his two decades living there. A few years ago, Albarn invited several orchestral musicians from Reykjavík into his living room to — in his words — play the landscape. This collaboration served as the foundation to his new solo album, The Nearer the Fountain, More Pure the Stream Flows. It's a reflection on the evolving landscape of a place he loves dearly and a statement on climate change, written against the backdrop of a global pandemic. This is not like his previous work, Gorillaz's "Feel Good Inc." or Blur's "Song 2." It's a beautiful, introspective, lush and layered record that is, at times, uncomfortable — much like the setting that inspired the music you'll hear on this episode.

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