Scientists discover the fossilized remains of an ancient millipede in England The remains are the length of a small car dating from before the time of the dinosaurs. The animal is believed to have broken the record for the largest-known arthropod.

Scientists discover the fossilized remains of an ancient millipede in England

Scientists discover the fossilized remains of an ancient millipede in England

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The remains are the length of a small car dating from before the time of the dinosaurs. The animal is believed to have broken the record for the largest-known arthropod.

A MARTINEZ, HOST:

Good morning. I'm A Martinez. Bugs are generally small, creepy, and you can't always tell if they're dangerous. Well, English scientists discovered the prehistoric remains of a bug that checks those boxes, except it's not small. They found a millipede that was more than 8 feet long, nearly 2 feet wide and weighed more than a hundred pounds, officially crowning it the biggest bug that ever lived and now what my nightmare will be about when I go to sleep tonight. It's MORNING EDITION.

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