Countries Accused Of Human Rights Abuses Are Pouring Money Into Soccer : Consider This from NPR A new owner can change everything for a professional sports team. And in the world of professional soccer, more and more of those new owners are countries accused of human rights abuses.

Former Manchester City player Nedum Onuoha describes what it was like when a member of the Abu Dhabi royal family took charge of his club.

Plus, New York Times reporter Tariq Panja explains why complaints about where money is coming from does little to change this growing trend, as evidenced by the recent purchase of Newcastle United by a Saudi-led investment group.

And in case you missed it on our All Things Considered radio broadcast, co-host of the show and of this podcast Audie Cornish is considering a new adventure and leaving NPR. You can hear the show's tribute to Audie here.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Countries Accused Of Human Rights Abuses Are Pouring Money Into Soccer

Countries Accused Of Human Rights Abuses Are Pouring Money Into Soccer

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The Premier League soccer team Newcastle United was purchased by a Saudi-led investment in the fall. Scott Heppell/AP hide caption

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Scott Heppell/AP

The Premier League soccer team Newcastle United was purchased by a Saudi-led investment in the fall.

Scott Heppell/AP

A new owner can change everything for a professional sports team. And in the world of professional soccer, more and more of those new owners are countries accused of human rights abuses.

Former Manchester City player Nedum Onuoha describes what it was like when a member of the Abu Dhabi royal family took charge of his club.

Plus, New York Times reporter Tariq Panja explains why complaints about where money is coming from does little to change this growing trend, as evidenced by the recent purchase of Newcastle United by a Saudi-led investment group.

And in case you missed it on our All Things Considered radio broadcast, co-host of the show and of this podcast Audie Cornish is considering a new adventure and leaving NPR. You can hear the show's tribute to Audie here.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Lee Hale. It was edited by Christopher Intagliata and Ashley Brown, with additional reporting from Fatma Tanis. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.