How inland ports are being used to get around shipping backlogs : Planet Money : The Indicator from Planet Money Disruptive backlogs at west coast ports in the U.S. have caused some shippers to get creative with their routes. Today, we tell you why one vessel took the long route from Shanghai to Cleveland, Ohio.

Inland port priority

Inland port priority

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The Happy Rover at the Port of Cleveland. Dustin Dwyer, Michigan Radio hide caption

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Dustin Dwyer, Michigan Radio

The Happy Rover at the Port of Cleveland.

Dustin Dwyer, Michigan Radio

At this point, the stories about massive backlogs at ports all along the coasts in the United States are well documented. They are often cited as the reason for supply chain disruptions and the federal government stepping in to make them run more efficiently.

However, some shippers are quite literally, trying to get around these disruptions. Today on the Indicator, we track the route of the Happy Rover. A vessel that took the long way from Shanghai all the way to the Port of Cleveland.

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