We follow what people are returning through the reverse logistics supply chain. : Planet Money Lenient policies have shoppers making more returns than ever — around half a trillion dollars worth of products. Today, we find out the fate of some of those returned goods.

No such thing as a free return

No such thing as a free return

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A Woody action figure lays in a pile of returned goods that are resold at Treasure Hunt Bin Megastore. Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi hide caption

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Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi

A Woody action figure lays in a pile of returned goods that are resold at Treasure Hunt Bin Megastore.

Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi

Return policies have been around at least since Sears started offering customers a "money back guarantee" over 100 years ago. Since then, generous return policies have become the norm. Customers have come to expect the option to send back the things they buy. But the right to return has also opened up a Pandora's box for retailers. And as online shopping has grown, so have returns.

But many returned goods don't find their way back on shelves. Instead, they wind up at stores like the Treasure Hunt Bin Megastore — where liquidated pallets of returned goods get unloaded every Thursday and sold throughout the week. Today, we follow two resellers on their treasure hunt to find returned goods they can flip for profit.

Music: "Collectible Kicks" "Burger Extra" and "Call Me Yours."

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