Elvis Costello is still trying to grow up : World Cafe : World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN The phrase "young at heart" is a cliché, but when it comes to Elvis Costello, it really does apply. The Boy Named If is a trip through the inner life of a young person growing up full of imagination and self-discovery.

Elvis Costello is still trying to grow up

Elvis Costello on World Cafe

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Elvis Costello Lens O'Toole/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Lens O'Toole/Courtesy of the artist

Elvis Costello

Lens O'Toole/Courtesy of the artist

Playlist

  • "Magnificent Hurt"
  • "Penelope Halfpenny"
  • "The Death Of Magic Thinking"
  • "Paint The Red Rose Blue"

The phrase "young at heart" is a cliché at this point – but when it comes to Elvis Costello, it really does apply. His latest album with the Imposters, The Boy Named If (And Other Children's Stories), is a trip through the inner life of a young male, growing up full of imagination and self-discovery. Appropriately, for someone who really is young at heart, Costello also wrote an entire picture book to go along with the album that includes 13 illustrated short stories.

In this session Costello, who is married to fellow musician Diana Krall, talks about making the record, and about his own experiences growing up — something he says he's still working on.

Episode Playlist