Hawaii, Fossil Fuels, And Clean Electricity : Short Wave Sixty percent of electricity in the U.S. comes from fossil fuels, like natural gas and coal. Today on the show, guest host Dan Charles talks with reporter Julia Simon about how Hawaii is fighting climate change by throwing out what's been standard for many decades and encouraging the state's power company to make clean electricity.

For more of Julia's reporting, check out "Biden's climate agenda is stalled in Congress. In Hawaii, one key part is going ahead." <<https://n.pr/3FE1CHF>>

Email Short Wave at ShortWave@NPR.org.

A Clean Energy Future: How Hawaii Is Sparking The Push

A Clean Energy Future: How Hawaii Is Sparking The Push

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It took about a decade to get the Ku'ia Solar plant in Lahaina, Maui up and running. Hawaii's utility commissioners hope that new "performance-based regulation" will better incentivize the monopoly utility to get solar plants like this onto the grid more quickly. Julia Simon for NPR hide caption

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Julia Simon for NPR

It took about a decade to get the Ku'ia Solar plant in Lahaina, Maui up and running. Hawaii's utility commissioners hope that new "performance-based regulation" will better incentivize the monopoly utility to get solar plants like this onto the grid more quickly.

Julia Simon for NPR

Sixty percent of electricity in the U.S. comes from fossil fuels, like natural gas and coal. Today on the show, guest host Dan Charles talks with reporter Julia Simon about how Hawaii is fighting climate change by throwing out what's been standard for many decades and encouraging the state's power company to make clean electricity.

For more of Julia's reporting, check out "Biden's climate agenda is stalled in Congress. In Hawaii, one key part is going ahead."

Email Short Wave at ShortWave@NPR.org.

This episode was produced by Thomas Lu, edited by Gisele Grayson and Stephanie O’Neill, and fact-checked by Indi Khera. The audio engineer for this episode was Gilly Moon.