The alarming online presence of suicide enablers; Cleaning alligators after oil spill : Here & Now Last month, The New York Times delved into one specific website which provides methods, encouragement and even pressure to die by suicide. Journalist Megan Twohey co-reported the story, which serves as a cautionary tale for those who find these sites while they're looking for support. And, in Louisiana, more than 30 alligators have received the scrubbing of a lifetime after an oil spill left them covered in diesel last December. The coordinator of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries' oil spill response team joins us.

The alarming online presence of suicide enablers; Cleaning alligators after oil spill

The alarming online presence of suicide enablers; Cleaning alligators after oil spill

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Last month, The New York Times delved into one specific website which provides methods, encouragement and even pressure to die by suicide. Journalist Megan Twohey co-reported the story, which serves as a cautionary tale for those who find these sites while they're looking for support.

And, in Louisiana, more than 30 alligators have received the scrubbing of a lifetime after an oil spill left them covered in diesel last December. The coordinator of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries' oil spill response team joins us.

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