How warehouses and ports have fared during the supply chain crisis : Planet Money Two stories about people trying to overcome supply chain challenges. We follow a ship that is forced to get creative to bypass clogged ports, and we visit a warehouse that is running out of space. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Two indicators: supply chain solutions

Two indicators: supply chain solutions

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A person walks in an Ikea warehouse in New York City on Oct. 15. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

A person walks in an Ikea warehouse in New York City on Oct. 15.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Warehouses and ports are key players in getting goods to consumers, and both have felt the brunt of the ongoing supply chain crisis. On today's show, two stories from the Indicator on how warehouses and ports are trying to overcome the crisis.

Despite a boom in warehouse construction, many warehouses across the country are running out of space. Some are even turning away long-time clients. Meanwhile, west coast ports have been backed up for months. We follow one container ship from Shanghai, China to the Port of Cleveland as it tries to find a way through the clog.

Music: "Street Groove" "Bossa Star" and "Graffiti Grin."

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