Why Americans Don't Have Universal Health Care : Throughline Health insurance for millions of Americans is dependent on their jobs. But it's not like that everywhere. So how did the U.S. end up with such a fragile system that leaves so many vulnerable—or with no health insurance at all? On this episode, how a temporary solution created an everlasting problem.

The Everlasting Problem (2020)

The Everlasting Problem (2020)

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Health care reform supporters participate in a sit-in inside the lobby of a building where Aetna insurance offices are located September 29, 2009 in New York City. The protesters were eventually arrested by NYPD. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Health care reform supporters participate in a sit-in inside the lobby of a building where Aetna insurance offices are located September 29, 2009 in New York City. The protesters were eventually arrested by NYPD. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Mario Tama/Getty Images

Health insurance for millions of Americans is dependent on their jobs. But it's not like that everywhere. So how did the U.S. end up with such a fragile system that leaves so many vulnerable—or with no health insurance at all? On this episode, how a temporary solution created an everlasting problem.

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