Biological anthropologist Tina Lasisi talks hair typing : Short Wave Humans have scalp hair. But why is human scalp hair so varied? Biological anthropologist Tina Lasisi wanted to find out. And while completing her PhD at Penn State University, she developed a better system for describing hair — rooted in actual science. (Encore)

To hear more from Tina, check out these webinars: Why Care About Hair (https://bit.ly/3liJZ96) and How Hair Reveals the Futility of Race Categories (https://s.si.edu/3Dik6g8). And to dive deep into Tina's research, we recommend her paper, The constraints of racialization: How classification and valuation hinder scientific research on human variation (https://bit.ly/3DfDrOS).

How to Talk About Hair Like a Scientist

How to Talk About Hair Like a Scientist

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Humans have scalp hair. But why is human scalp hair so varied? As a college student, Tina Lasisi wanted to find out. Eight years later, Tina is one of the few biological anthropologists in the world studying the evolution and morphology of human scalp hair.

While completing her PhD at Penn State University, Tina developed a better system for describing hair — rooted in actual science. On today's episode, the postdoctoral researcher breaks down her system, how hair typing brings up harmful racial categories and beauty standards, and her vision of hair science for the future.

To hear more from Tina, check out these webinars:

And to dive deep into Tina's research, we recommend the following:

Today’s episode was edited by Sara Sarasohn, produced by Rebecca Ramirez and fact-checked by Tyler Jones, who also pitched this episode and did research throughout. Special thanks to Remy Barnwell. The audio engineer for this episode was Natasha Branch.