The Story Behind One Uyghur Family Separation : Consider This from NPR China has been detaining and arresting ethnic Uyghurs in the region of Xinjiang en masse while their children are often sent to state boarding schools.

China closely guards information about Xinjiang, including about these forced family separations. But NPR's Beijing correspondent Emily Feng managed to talk to two children who made it out of one such school and are sharing their story for the first time.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Two Uyghur Children Describe What Life Was Like In A Chinese Boarding School

Two Uyghur Children Describe What Life Was Like In A Chinese Boarding School

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China has been detaining and arresting ethnic Uyghurs in the region of Xinjiang en masse while their children are often sent to state boarding schools.

China closely guards information about Xinjiang, including about these forced family separations. But NPR's Beijing correspondent Emily Feng managed to talk to two children who made it out of one such school and are sharing their story for the first time.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Lutfulla Kuçar, 8, waits at home for his sister Aysu to return from school, in Istanbul, Turkey, on Wednesday, December 1, 2021. For years, he was held in a Chinese 'reeducation' camp in China away from his family. Nicole Tung for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Tung for NPR

Lutfulla Kuçar, 8, waits at home for his sister Aysu to return from school, in Istanbul, Turkey, on Wednesday, December 1, 2021. For years, he was held in a Chinese 'reeducation' camp in China away from his family.

Nicole Tung for NPR

This episode was produced by Connor Donevan and Lee Hale. It was edited by Nishant Dahiya, Jennifer Schmidt and Fatma Tanis. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.