Physics And Figure Skating At The Winter Olympics : Short Wave Triple axel, double lutz, toe loops, salchows — it's time to fall in love again with the sport of figure skating. The 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing are underway, and today on the show, Emily Kwong talks with biomechanic Deborah King about some of the physics behind figure skating. Plus, we go to an ice rink to see it all in action.

You can email the show at ShortWave@NPR.org.

The Physics Of Figure Skating

The Physics Of Figure Skating

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Denis Margalik of Argentina skates in the Men's Short program during day 3 of the ISU World Figure Skating Championships 2016 at TD Garden. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Denis Margalik of Argentina skates in the Men's Short program during day 3 of the ISU World Figure Skating Championships 2016 at TD Garden.

Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Triple axel, double lutz, toe loops, salchows — it's time to fall in love again with the sport of figure skating. The 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing are underway, and today on the show, Emily Kwong talks with biomechanic Deborah King about some of the physics behind figure skating. Plus, we go to an ice rink to see it all in action.

You can email the show at ShortWave@NPR.org.

This episode was produced by Thomas Lu, edited by Geoff Brumfiel and Regina G. Barber, and fact-checked by Katherine Sypher. The audio engineer for this episode was Andie Huether.