American-Born Athletes Competing For China Experience Extra Scrutiny : Consider This from NPR Just under three dozen of China's athletes competing at the Olympics this year were born in other countries. Most famously, ski prodigy Eileen Gu, who has dozens of brand sponsorships and is praised on Chinese social media. That's in contrast to skater Zhu Yi, who has been called a "disgrace" after she fell during her short program. And the rhetoric appears on both sides. Some U.S. commentators have criticized Gu for her decision to compete for China.

Jules Boykoff is a political science professor at Pacific University and studies the politics of sports. He explains how politics play out in the Olympics. Amy Qin is a China correspondent for the New York Times. Her article on the subject is "The Olympians Caught Up in the U.S.-China Rivalry."

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

American-Born Athletes Competing For China Experience Extra Scrutiny

American-Born Athletes Competing For China Experience Extra Scrutiny

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A skier passes a billboard showing American-born freestyle skier Eileen Gu, or Gu Ailing, who competes for China. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

A skier passes a billboard showing American-born freestyle skier Eileen Gu, or Gu Ailing, who competes for China.

Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Just under three dozen of China's athletes competing at the Olympics this year were born in other countries. Most famously, ski prodigy Eileen Gu, who has dozens of brand sponsorships and is praised on Chinese social media. That's in contrast to skater Zhu Yi, who has been called a "disgrace" after she fell during her short program. And the rhetoric appears on both sides. Some U.S. commentators have criticized Gu for her decision to compete for China.

Jules Boykoff is a political science professor at Pacific University and studies the politics of sports. He explains how politics play out in the Olympics. Amy Qin is a China correspondent for the New York Times. Her article on the subject is "The Olympians Caught Up in the U.S.-China Rivalry."

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Mallory Yu and Christine Arrasmith. It was edited by Fatma Tanis and Russell Lewis. Our executive editor is Cara Tallo.