As Masks Come Off, Immunocompromised Americans Feel Left Behind : Consider This from NPR The latest CDC guidance puts nearly 70% of the U.S. population in low or medium risk areas, and residents are no longer expected to wear a mask. In response, the vast majority of states in the U.S. have lifted or plan to lift mask mandates.

While many Americans welcome the loosening of pandemic-era safety rules, people who are higher risk feel forgotten and left behind. Johnnie Jae is an Indigenous journalist and public speaker; Charis Hill is a disability activist; and Cass Condray is a university student. The three explain what it's like to be immunocompromised and chronically ill during the pandemic, and what can be done to allow them to better live their lives.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

As Masks Come Off, Immunocompromised Americans Feel Left Behind

As Masks Come Off, Immunocompromised Americans Feel Left Behind

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Charis Hill, Johnnie Jae and Cass Condray all have conditions that compromise their immune systems and put them at higher risk for severe COVID-19 infection. Brian Baker; Johnnie Jae; Greg Condray hide caption

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Brian Baker; Johnnie Jae; Greg Condray

Charis Hill, Johnnie Jae and Cass Condray all have conditions that compromise their immune systems and put them at higher risk for severe COVID-19 infection.

Brian Baker; Johnnie Jae; Greg Condray

The latest CDC guidance puts nearly 70% of the U.S. population in low or medium risk areas, and residents are no longer expected to wear a mask. The vast majority of states in the U.S. have lifted or plan to lift mask mandates.

While many Americans welcome the loosening of pandemic-era safety rules, people who are higher risk feel forgotten and left behind. Johnnie Jae is an Indigenous journalist and public speaker; Charis Hill is a disability activist; and Cass Condray is a university student. The three explain what it's like to be immunocompromised and chronically ill during the pandemic, and what can be done to allow them to better live their lives.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Mallory Yu. It was edited by Sarah Handel, Lee Hale and Fatma Tanis. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.