How do we define antisemitism? And how do we fight it? : It's Been a Minute With more extreme antisemitic attacks on the rise and more antisemitic rhetoric in the mainstream, antisemitism has become an increasingly pressing issue in the US. But at the same time, the conversation around antisemitism is getting more fraught. Sam talks with Dov Waxman, professor and director for the UCLA Y&S Nazarian Center for Israel Studies, about what people are getting wrong about antisemitism. They discuss why there's so much contention around what the term means, why it can be hard to talk about, and how to fight antisemitism when it happens.

You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

The trouble with defining antisemitism

The trouble with defining antisemitism

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Congregation Beth Israel synagogue in Colleyville, Texas. In January, an armed man stormed into the synagogue and held four people hostage for more than 10 hours. Getty Images hide caption

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Congregation Beth Israel synagogue in Colleyville, Texas. In January, an armed man stormed into the synagogue and held four people hostage for more than 10 hours.

Getty Images

With more extreme antisemitic attacks on the rise and more antisemitic rhetoric in the mainstream, antisemitism has become an increasingly pressing issue in the US. But at the same time, the conversation around antisemitism is getting more fraught. Sam talks with Dov Waxman, professor and director for the UCLA Y&S Nazarian Center for Israel Studies, about what people are getting wrong about antisemitism. They discuss why there's so much contention around what the term means, why it can be hard to talk about, and how to fight antisemitism when it happens.

This episode was produced by Liam McBain. It was edited by Jordana Hochman. Engineering help came from Patrick Murray. You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.