Five Years After Trump's "Muslim Ban" : Consider This from NPR Just one week into his presidency, Donald Trump announced an executive order banning people from several Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S., the so-called "Muslim Ban".

This ban shut out travelers who were already on their way to the U.S. Visas were canceled, people were detained and sent back home, and protests ensued. Lawsuits were filed, but the Supreme Court upheld the policy.

On his first day in office, President Biden reversed the ban. But five years later, hundreds of families that were separated by it are still waiting to be united.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Five Years After Trump's "Muslim Ban"

Five Years After Trump's "Muslim Ban"

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1084565893/1200110422" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Outside the Supreme Court, people protest the ruling upholding President Donald Trump's travel ban on June 26, 2018. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Outside the Supreme Court, people protest the ruling upholding President Donald Trump's travel ban on June 26, 2018.

Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Just one week into his presidency, Donald Trump announced an executive order banning people from several Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S., the so-called "Muslim Ban".

This ban shut out travelers who were already on their way to the U.S. Visas were canceled, people were detained and sent back home, and protests ensued. Lawsuits were filed, but the Supreme Court upheld the policy.

On his first day in office, President Biden reversed the ban. But five years later, hundreds of families that were separated by it are still waiting to be united.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Mia Venkat and Karen Zamora. It was edited by Fatma Tanis and Amy Isackson. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.