The Daylight Saving Debate : 1A This weekend marked the beginning of Daylight Saving Time.

And there's a bill in Congress to make it permanent, which would mean never changing our clocks again.

Nineteen states have already made it clear that they'd make the switch if Congress says okay.

How did this biannual ritual come about anyway? And what are our other options?

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The Daylight Saving Debate

The Daylight Saving Debate

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Howie Brown adjusts the time on a clock back one hour for the end of day light savings time at Brown's Old Time Clock Shop in Plantation, Florida. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Howie Brown adjusts the time on a clock back one hour for the end of day light savings time at Brown's Old Time Clock Shop in Plantation, Florida.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

This weekend marked the beginning of Daylight Saving Time.

And there's a bill in Congress to make it permanent, which would mean never changing our clocks again.

Nineteen states have already made it clear that they'd make the switch if Congress says okay.

How did this biannual ritual come about anyway? And what are our other options?

Dr. Beth Malow, David Prerau, and Mike Freiberg join us for the conversation.

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