Julissa Arce rejects assimilation in 'You Sound Like a White Girl' : It's Been a Minute A school crush once told Julissa Arce that she sounded "like a white girl." At the time, Arce believed that was exactly what she wanted. But over the years, even after perfecting "accent-less" English, graduating from college, getting a job at Goldman Sachs, and becoming an American citizen, Arce still felt like she didn't belong. Instead of just trying to fit in as the solution, Arce began to question whether that was the very problem to begin with. Elise Hu talks to Arce about her new book — You Sound Like a White Girl — and the case for rejecting assimilation in favor of embracing yourself, your history, and your culture.

Rejecting assimilation in 'You Sound Like a White Girl'

Rejecting assimilation in 'You Sound Like a White Girl'

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Author Julissa Arce makes the case for rejecting assimilation in her latest book, You Sound Like a White Girl. Aly Honore hide caption

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Aly Honore

Author Julissa Arce makes the case for rejecting assimilation in her latest book, You Sound Like a White Girl.

Aly Honore

A school crush once told Julissa Arce that she sounded "like a white girl." At the time, Arce believed that was exactly what she wanted. But over the years, even after perfecting "accent-less" English, graduating from college, getting a job at Goldman Sachs, and becoming an American citizen, Arce still felt like she didn't belong. Instead of just trying to fit in as the solution, Arce began to question whether that was the very problem to begin with. Elise Hu talks to Arce about her new book — You Sound Like a White Girl — and the case for rejecting assimilation in favor of embracing yourself, your history, and your culture.

This episode was produced by Jinae West with help from Andrea Gutierrez and edited by Jordana Hochman. We had engineering support from Gilly Moon. You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at ibam@npr.org.