How The War In Ukraine Is Affecting Afghanistan's Growing Famine : 1A It's been more than six months since the Taliban took over Afghanistan, displacing hundreds of thousands of people.

The United Nations refugee agency predicted that by the end of last year, more than half a million people would flee the Taliban-controlled country. Some of those refugees settled in Ukraine, and are once again in the middle of a conflict.

The war in Eastern Europe is "potentially apocalyptic" for Afghanistan's growing famine, and for its collapsing economy.

So, how is the war on Ukraine weighing on the humanitarian crisis there? And what does it mean for refugees in the US and elsewhere?

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How The War In Ukraine Is Affecting Afghanistan's Growing Famine

How The War In Ukraine Is Affecting Afghanistan's Growing Famine

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It's been more than six months since the Taliban took over Afghanistan's government, forcing thousands of Afghans to flee. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

It's been more than six months since the Taliban took over Afghanistan's government, forcing thousands of Afghans to flee.

Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

It's been more than six months since the Taliban took over Afghanistan, displacing hundreds of thousands.

The United Nations refugee agency predicted that by the end of last year, more than half a million people would flee the Taliban-controlled country. Some of those refugees settled in Ukraine, and are once again in the middle of a conflict. Since Russia invaded the country, the U.N. says it's caused the fastest-growing refugee crisis since World War II.

But, the war in Eastern Europe is "potentially apocalyptic" for Afghanistan's growing famine, and for its collapsing economy. That's what Graeme Smith, a senior consultant from the International Crisis Group told The New York Times.

David Miliband, president and CEO of the International Rescue Committee, has also called out the "catastrophic damage" the U.S. and West inflicted on Afghanistan through its sanctions and freezing billions of dollars in assets.

The U.N. reports that nearly 95 percent of Afghans are not eating enough. And children are most vulnerable to acute starvation.

For the 76,000 Afghan refugees in the U.S. though, there is a bit more security. The Biden administration recently granted them temporary protected status, or TPS, which bars deportation and allows for work permits.

So, how is the war on Ukraine weighing on the humanitarian crisis there? And what does it mean for refugees in the US and elsewhere?

David Miliband, Christina Goldbaum, and Joseph Azam join us for the conversation.

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