Why Gas Is So Expensive, And There's No Easy Fix : Consider This from NPR This week, the average price for a gallon of gas in L.A. County crested six dollars — the highest in the country. The national average is up around 70 cents in the last month.

The are a lot of complicated reasons why gas is more expensive — and a lot of ideas for how to make this easier on consumers. But none of them are quick or easy.

NPR's Scott Horsley explains why drivers who are newly interested in purchasing an electric vehicle might not have a lot of options.

NPR's Brittany Cronin reports on calls for more domestic oil production in the U.S. — and why it may take some time for that to happen.

Here's more on why gas prices are so high from NPR's Chris Arnold.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

High Gas Prices: Why There's No Quick Fix

High Gas Prices: Why There's No Quick Fix

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High gas prices are displayed at a Mobil station across the street from the Beverly Center on March 7, 2022 in Los Angeles, California. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

High gas prices are displayed at a Mobil station across the street from the Beverly Center on March 7, 2022 in Los Angeles, California.

Mario Tama/Getty Images

This week, the average price for a gallon of gas in L.A. County crested six dollars — the highest in the country. The national average is up around 70 cents in the last month.

The are a lot of complicated reasons why gas is more expensive — and a lot of ideas for how to make this easier on consumers. But none of them are quick or easy.

NPR's Scott Horsley explains why drivers who are newly interested in purchasing an electric vehicle might not have a lot of options.

NPR's Brittany Cronin reports on calls for more domestic oil production in the U.S. — and why it may take some time for that to happen.

Here's more on why gas prices are so high from NPR's Chris Arnold.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman and Jonaki Mehta. It was edited by Fatma Tanis, Scott Horsley, Rafael Nam, Brittany Cronin, and Chris Arnold. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.