The dance that made its way from Harlem to Sweden : Code Switch Lindy Hop is a dance that was born in Harlem in the 1920s and 1930s — created and performed by African Americans in segregated clubs and dance halls. But today, one of the world's most vibrant Lindy Hop communities is in Sweden. So what happens when a Black American wants to learn the art form that she first encountered at the hands of her great-grandmother?

The dance that made its way from Harlem to Sweden

The dance that made its way from Harlem to Sweden

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LaTasha Barnes is a tradition-bearer of Black social dances, including the Lindy Hop. Cassidy Araiza for NPR hide caption

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Cassidy Araiza for NPR

LaTasha Barnes is a tradition-bearer of Black social dances, including the Lindy Hop.

Cassidy Araiza for NPR

Lindy Hop is a dance that was born in Harlem in the 1920s and 1930s — created and performed by African Americans in segregated clubs and dance halls. But today, one of the world's most vibrant Lindy Hop communities is in Sweden. So what happens when a Black American wants to learn the art form that she first encountered at the hands of her great-grandmother? Well, in this case, she hopped on a plane.

This episode, brought to us by our friends at Rough Translation, tells a story of what it means to encounter old traditions in very different contexts, and asks who exactly should be passing down traditions.

You can read more about Lindy Hop — and find the full episode show notes — right here.