What Should Ginni Thomas' Texts Mean for Justice Clarence Thomas' Work? : Consider This from NPR Ginni Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, is a longtime conservative activist who has been public about her views and support of former President Donald Trump. And text messages that surfaced last week showed that she went as far as peddling falsehoods about the 2020 election directly to former White House staff and urging them to overturn President Joe Biden's victory.

Earlier this year, Clarence Thomas was the sole dissenter as the Supreme Court ruled to give a House select committee investigating the January 6th attack access to White House communications during that period.

NPR's Nina Totenberg reports on why this possible conflict of interest is a true dilemma for the court and spoke with legal experts about what should happen next.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

What Should Ginni Thomas' Texts Mean for Justice Clarence Thomas' Work?

What Should Ginni Thomas' Texts Mean for Justice Clarence Thomas' Work?

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Associate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas sits with his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas while he waits to speak at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Associate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas sits with his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas while he waits to speak at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021 in Washington, DC.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Ginni Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, is a longtime conservative activist who has been public about her views and support of former President Donald Trump. And text messages that surfaced last week showed that she went as far as peddling falsehoods about the 2020 election directly to former White House staff and urging them to overturn President Joe Biden's victory.

Earlier this year, Clarence Thomas was the sole dissenter as the Supreme Court ruled to give a House select committee investigating the January 6th attack access to White House communications during that period.

NPR's Nina Totenberg reports on why this possible conflict of interest is a true dilemma for the court and spoke with legal experts about what should happen next.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Lee Hale. It was edited by Ashley Brown and Arnie Seipel. Additional reporting from Claudia Grisales. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.