The Pandemic Is Damaging Health Workers' Mental Health : Short Wave A recent study found that working surge after surge in the pandemic, a majority of American health care workers experienced psychiatric symptoms — including depression and thoughts of suicide. And yet, mental health correspondent Rhitu Chatterjee found that very few got help for these symptoms.

If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. Or text the word home to 741741.

The Pandemic Is Damaging Health Workers' Mental Health

The Pandemic Is Damaging Health Workers' Mental Health

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Close friends Joshua Paredes, Michael Walujo and John LeBlanc are working together to set up a crisis help line for fellow nurses following the suicide of their friend Michael Odell in January. Rachel Bujalski for NPR hide caption

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Rachel Bujalski for NPR

Close friends Joshua Paredes, Michael Walujo and John LeBlanc are working together to set up a crisis help line for fellow nurses following the suicide of their friend Michael Odell in January.

Rachel Bujalski for NPR

A recent study found that during the pandemic's surge after surge, a majority of American health care workers experienced psychiatric symptoms. And yet, mental health correspondent Rhitu Chatterjee found that very few got help for these symptoms.

If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. Or text the word home to 741741.

This story was edited for radio by Rebecca Davis and for Short Wave by Gisele Grayson. It was produced for radio by Jeevika Verma and for Short Wave by Rebecca Ramirez. The audio engineer was Tre Watson.