Addressing Water Contamination With Indigenous Science : Short Wave Ranalda Tsosie grew up in the Navajo Nation, close to a number of abandoned uranium mines. The uranium from those mines leached into the groundwater, contaminating some of the unregulated wells that Ranalda and many others relied on for cooking, cleaning and drinking water. Today on the show, Ranalda talks to host Aaron Scott about her path to becoming an environmental chemist to study the extent of contamination in her home community using a blend of western and Diné science methods.

Addressing Water Contamination With Indigenous Science

Addressing Water Contamination With Indigenous Science

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Signs warning of health risks are posted outside the gates of abandoned uranium mine in the community of Red Water Pond on Monday, Jan. 13th, 2020. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Signs warning of health risks are posted outside the gates of abandoned uranium mine in the community of Red Water Pond on Monday, Jan. 13th, 2020.

The Washington Post/Getty Images

Ranalda Tsosie grew up in the Navajo Nation, close to a number of abandoned uranium mines. The uranium from those mines leached into the groundwater, contaminating some of the unregulated wells that Ranalda and many others relied on for cooking, cleaning and drinking water. Today on the show, Ranalda talks to host Aaron Scott about her path to becoming an environmental chemist to study the extent of contamination in her home community using a blend of western and Diné science methods.

This episode was produced by Berly McCoy, edited by Gisele Grayson and fact checked by Katherine Sypher. The audio engineer was Natasha Branch.