The secret world of ballpark vendors : Planet Money Ballpark vendors share their strategies and other secrets to selling the most hot dogs at baseball games. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Peanuts and Cracker Jack (Classic)

Peanuts and Cracker Jack (Classic)

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Jose Magrass, hot dog selling machine. Nick Fountain/NPR hide caption

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Nick Fountain/NPR

Note: This episode originally ran in 2016.

After a contentious lockout, Major League Baseball club owners and the players' union came to an agreement last month. And the 2022 baseball season is in full swing.

But while fans watch their teams face off on the field, they might not realize there's a very different game being played up in the stands – one that demands hours of nonstop effort. The players in this game are vendors, the ballpark workers who run up and down stairs, carrying cases of water and bins of hot dogs above their heads. They are competing to sell as much overpriced junk food, in as little time as possible.

On today's show: The secret world of ballpark vendors. It's a game of weather forecasting, ruthless efficiency, sore thighs, and swollen vocal cords.

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