Here's Where And Why The Gender Wage Gap Is Closing : 1A When it comes to women succeeding in the workforce, there's a lot to talk about.

The "She-cession," burnout, and, of course, wages.

Despite all of that, there is some progress in the way of gender pay parity. New analysis from Pew Research Center found that the wage gap is closing in 22 metropolitan areas.

In fact, in some cities, women are out-earning their male counterparts.

What's the state of the gender wage gap? And who is it closing for?

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Here's Where And Why The Gender Wage Gap Is Closing

Here's Where And Why The Gender Wage Gap Is Closing

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People work at computers in the community space.

Sean Gallup/Getty Images

When it comes to women succeeding in the workforce, there's a lot to talk about.

The "She-cession," burnout, and, of course, wages.

Despite all of that, there is some progress in the way of gender pay parity. New analysis from Pew Research Center found that the wage gap is closing in 22 metropolitan areas. In fact, in some cities, women are out-earning their male counterparts:

The New York, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles metropolitan areas are among the cities where young women are earning the most relative to young men. In both the New York and Washington metro areas, young women earn 102% of what young men earn when examining median annual earnings among full-time, year-round workers.

We discuss the state of the gender wage gap and who it's closing for.

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