Nina Jankowicz addresses disproportionate online attacks against women in a new : NPR's Book of the Day According to Nina Jankowicz, a fellow at the Wilson Center known for her research on online disinformation, women face a disproportionate amount of attacks online. These range from physical insults to threats of violence, and they're forcing women – especially younger ones – to censor themselves out of fear of physical or emotional retribution. In her new book, How to Be a Woman Online, she offers practical advice for those who, lacking institutional help, have to address these matters solely on their own.

'How to Be a Woman Online' tackles online harassment against women

'How to Be a Woman Online' tackles online harassment against women

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According to Nina Jankowicz, a fellow at the Wilson Center known for her research on online disinformation, women face a disproportionate amount of attacks online. These range from physical insults to threats of violence, and they're forcing women – especially younger ones – to censor themselves out of fear of physical or emotional retribution. In her new book, How to Be a Woman Online, she offers practical advice for those who, lacking institutional help, have to address these matters solely on their own.