Remain In Mexico: Will The Supreme Court Let Biden End Trump's Asylum Policy? : The NPR Politics Podcast The Biden administration has repeatedly tried to end the policy, which requires migrants making an asylum claim in the U.S. to reside in Mexico until their immigration court date, only to be forced to reinstate it by the courts. Now, the Supreme Court will consider the president's powers on the issue.

Also before the court: a public high school football coach in Washington was not rehired to his job after he chose to lead prayers on the field with his players. He later sued the school. The case is one of many religious freedom cases before a court that recently rules in favor of the expression of religion.

This episode: voting reporter Miles Parks, immigration correspondent Joel Rose, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.

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Remain In Mexico: Will The Supreme Court Let Biden End Trump's Asylum Policy?

Remain In Mexico: Will The Supreme Court Let Biden End Trump's Asylum Policy?

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The Biden administration has repeatedly tried to end the policy, which requires migrants making an asylum claim in the U.S. to reside in Mexico until their immigration court date, only to be forced to reinstate it by the courts. Now, the Supreme Court will consider the president's powers on the issue.

Also before the court: a public high school football coach in Washington was not rehired to his job after he chose to lead prayers on the field with his players. He later sued the school. The case is one of many religious freedom cases before the court in which the appear likely to upend precedent.

Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

Connect:
Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org
Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Find and support your local public radio station.