Planetary Scientists Are Excited About Uranus : Short Wave Probes to Uranus and to one of Jupiter's moons where conditions might support life; a better plan high-quality science on the moon--those are some of the recommendations in a new 700 page report to NASA. NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce has looked at that report and talked to the experts. Today, she sifts through all the juicy details of where NASA is headed the next few decades.

Read the decadal survey.

Probe the Short Wave minds by emailing shortwave@npr.org.

Planetary Scientists Are Excited About Uranus

Planetary Scientists Are Excited About Uranus

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An image of the planet Uranus taken by the spacecraft Voyager 2 as it flew by in January 1986. NASA/JPL hide caption

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NASA/JPL

An image of the planet Uranus taken by the spacecraft Voyager 2 as it flew by in January 1986.

NASA/JPL

Probes to Uranus and to one of Jupiter's moons where conditions might support life; a better plan high-quality science on the moon--those are some of the recommendations in a new 700 page report to NASA. NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce has looked at that report and talked to the experts. Today, she sifts through all the juicy details of where NASA is headed the next few decades.

Read the decadal survey.

Probe the Short Wave minds by emailing shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was edited by Gisele Grayson, produced by Rebecca Ramirez and fact-checked by Margaret Cirino. Patrick Murray was the audio engineer.