Legendary jazz bassist Ron Carter : Bullseye with Jesse Thorn Ron Carter is a legend in the world of jazz. His work as a bassist has appeared on thousands of recordings, and has the world records to prove it. In a career that spans over five decades, he's won three Grammys – and he's worked with folks like Miles Davis, Alice Coltrane, Aretha Franklin, Herbie Hancock, Billy Joel and A Tribe Called Quest. Ron takes us back to when he first picked up an instrument, the cello; and how he eventually found the bass. We'll also talk about the time he played bass for A Tribe Called Quest on Low End Theory – and how he gave them the business about their foul language.

Legendary jazz bassist Ron Carter

The jazz musician on his childhood, and his latest record 'Skyline'

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NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 2: Ron Carter performs with Lalo Schifrin September 2, 2003 in New York City. Lalo's rare and live performances mark his first club dates in more than 30 years. (Photo by Mark Mainz/Getty Images) Mark Mainz/Getty Images hide caption

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In a career that spans over five decades, Ron Carter has played jazz, classical, soul and hip-hop.

He's won three Grammys. Ron's worked with folks like Miles Davis, Alice Coltrane, Aretha Franklin, Herbie Hancock, Billy Joel and A Tribe Called Quest.

Take his contributions on It's Compared to What by Roberta Flack – the first song on her debut album First Take.

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The bass in the song is catchy, funky, a little mesmerizing. It alternates between forefront and background, effortlessly. Carter played bass on the entire record, and it's a masterclass in the instrument.

He's appeared on thousands of recordings as a jazz bassist, and has the world records to prove it.

On Tuesday, May 10, he'll celebrate his 85th birthday in style: with a tribute concert at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

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Carter takes us back to when he first picked up an instrument, the cello; and how he eventually found the bass. We'll also talk about the time he played bass for A Tribe Called Quest on Low End Theory – and how he gave them the business about their foul language.