What Cremation's Surge In Popularity Says About Our Evolving Views On Death : 1A According to the Cremation Association of North America (CANA), 56 percent of Americans who died in 2020 were cremated.That's more than twice the rate two decades ago.

What's behind this surge? And what does it suggest about the way our cultural values have shifted?

For families scattered across multiple states, there often seems little point in investing the effort and expense to bury a loved one in a cemetery no one will visit. Like pet food and leisure footwear, cremation is now available through direct-to-consumer websites such as Solace and Tulip.

We talk with deathcare experts about the rise of cremation.

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What Cremation's Surge In Popularity Says About Our Evolving Views On Death

What Cremation's Surge In Popularity Says About Our Evolving Views On Death

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What's behind the surge in cremation? And what does it suggest about the way our cultural values have shifted? Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

What's behind the surge in cremation? And what does it suggest about the way our cultural values have shifted?

Chris Hondros/Getty Images

According to the Cremation Association of North America (CANA), 56 percent of Americans who died in 2020 were cremated.

That's more than twice the rate two decades ago.

From The Washington Post:

Cremation finally skyrocketed as America became increasingly secular. Last year, the number of people belonging to a house of worship dropped below 50 percent for the first time since Gallup launched the poll in 1937.

Americans also started to recognize the convenience of cremation and its lower cost. Comparisons are challenging because of the many options, but the median price of a funeral with burial and viewing is $7,848, according to the NFDA, while the median cost of direct cremation is a third of the price at $2,550. Cremation with viewing and funeral is comparable to traditional burial, with a median cost of $6,970.

For families scattered across multiple states, there often seems little point in investing the effort and expense to bury a loved one in a cemetery no one will visit. Like pet food and leisure footwear, cremation is now available through direct-to-consumer websites such as Solace and Tulip.

What's behind this surge? And what does it suggest about the way our cultural values have shifted?

Tanya Marsh, Michael Doyle, Laura Sussman, Michael Holland, and David Charles Sloane join us for the conversation.

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