Who Would Be Most Affected By Roe Reversal : Short Wave If the U.S. Supreme Court rules in line with the draft decision leaked in early May, the decision to reverse Roe v. Wade affect a much broader group than people who get pregnant. But research shows abortion restrictions have a disproportionate impact on young women, poor women and especially those in communities of color.

NPR health correspondent Yuki Noguchi talks to Short Wave scientist-in-residence Regina G. Barber about how this ruling would affect those women and how groups helping them get abortions are preparing.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

Who Would Be Most Affected By Roe Reversal

Who Would Be Most Affected By Roe Reversal

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Alex Brandon/AP
The U.S. Supreme Court building is shown Wednesday, May 4, 2022 in Washington. A draft opinion suggests the U.S. Supreme Court could be poised to overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade case that legalized abortion nationwide, according to a Politico report released Monday.
Alex Brandon/AP

If the U.S. Supreme Court rules in line with the draft decision leaked in early May, the decision to reverse Roe v. Wade affect a much broader group than people who get pregnant. But research shows abortion restrictions have a disproportionate impact on young women, poor women and especially those in communities of color.

NPR health correspondent Yuki Noguchi talks to Short Wave scientist-in-residence Regina G. Barber about how this ruling would affect those women and how groups helping them get abortions are preparing.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

Jane Greenhalgh and Gisele Grayson edited this story. Eva Tesfaye was the producer, Margaret Cirino checked the facts. The audio engineer was Kwesi Lee.