In thimble-sized pots, researchers wanted to see if the moon could grow food Decades ago, Apollo astronauts gathered hundreds of pounds of lunar rocks and dirt. Last year, NASA loaned scientists at the University of Florida some of the soil, and they sprouted seedlings.

In thimble-sized pots, researchers wanted to see if the moon could grow food

In thimble-sized pots, researchers wanted to see if the moon could grow food

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Decades ago, Apollo astronauts gathered hundreds of pounds of lunar rocks and dirt. Last year, NASA loaned scientists at the University of Florida some of the soil, and they sprouted seedlings.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

There's no evidence of the old story the moon is made of cheese, but researchers wanted to know if the moon can grow food. Decades ago, Apollo astronauts gathered hundreds of pounds of lunar rocks and dirt. Last year, NASA loaned scientists at the University of Florida a few teaspoons of that soil, and they sprouted seedlings in thimble-sized pots. That's one small step for plants, one giant leap for vegetable kind.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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