TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some : Short Wave Love the bitter bite of dark chocolate, leafy greens or black licorice? Your genetics may be the reason why. Today on the show, host Aaron Scott talks to scientist Masha Niv about how our bitter taste buds work and how a simple taste test can predict your tolerance for some bitter things. Plus, what bitter receptors elsewhere in the body have to do with your health.

To listen to more episodes about how we taste, check out our TASTE BUDDIES series: https://n.pr/3LkXOh7

TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some

TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some

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Girl grimaces in front of a spoon of bitter medicine. timsa/Getty Images hide caption

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timsa/Getty Images

Girl grimaces in front of a spoon of bitter medicine.

timsa/Getty Images

Love the bitter bite of dark chocolate, leafy greens or black licorice? Your genetics may be the reason why. Today on the show, host Aaron Scott talks to scientist Masha Niv about how our bitter taste buds work and how a simple taste test can predict your tolerance for some bitter things. Plus, what bitter receptors elsewhere in the body have to do with your health.

To listen to more episodes about how we taste, check out our TASTE BUDDIES series: https://n.pr/3LkXOh7

This episode was produced by Berly McCoy, edited by Stephanie O’Neill and fact checked by Margaret Cirino. The audio engineer was Natasha Branch.