Who Else Can See Your Period Tracker Data? : Short Wave Apps can be a great way to stay on top of your health. They let users keep track of things like exercise, mental health, the quality of their skin, and even menstrual cycles.

But health researchers Giulia De Togni and Andrea Ford have found that many of these health apps also have a dark side — selling your most personal data to third parties like advertisers, insurers and tech companies. Emily talks to the researchers about the commodification of data, and their suggestions for increasing the security of your - the consumer's - information.

Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

Who Else Can See Your Period Tracker Data?

Who Else Can See Your Period Tracker Data?

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Apps can be a great way to stay on top of your health. They let users keep track of things like exercise, mental health, the quality of their skin, and even menstrual cycles.

But health researchers Giulia De Togni and Andrea Ford have found that many of these health apps also have a dark side — selling your most personal data to third parties like advertisers, insurers and tech companies. Emily talks to the researchers about the commodification of data, and their suggestions for increasing the security of your - the consumer's - information.

Email us with your tech concerns at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was edited by Sara Sarasohn and produced by Rebecca Ramirez and Margaret Cirino. Margaret also checked the facts. Patrick Murray was the audio engineer.