Why New York tax code considers a burrito a sandwich. : Planet Money A sandwich is generally defined as something delicious slapped between two slices of bread. New York tax code would beg to differ. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

How the burrito became a sandwich (Classic)

How the burrito became a sandwich (Classic)

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Burrito
NPR

Note: This original episode ran in 2014.

We all know what a sandwich is. It's something delicious, slapped between two slices of bread.

But when it comes to taxes, nothing is simple.

Today on the show, what regulating sandwiches and all other takeout food tells us about taxation. And how something as simple as the sandwich sales tax ends up spawning a complicated list of definitions, interlocking exemptions and rules which somehow transform the burrito into a sandwich in the eyes of the law.

Music: "Back In The Day," "The Vibe Side of Life," and "What Da Funk."

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