The Queen of Nuclear Physics (Part One): Chien-Shiung Wu's Discovery : Short Wave In the 1950's, a particle physicist made a landmark discovery that changed what was known about how the universe operates. Chien-Shiung Wu did it while raising a family and an ocean away from her relatives in China.

Short Wave's Scientist-In-Residence Regina Barber joins host Emily Kwong to talk about that landmark discovery—what it meant for the physics world, and what it means to Regina personally as a woman and a Chinese and Mexican American in physics.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

The Queen of Nuclear Physics (Part One): Chien-Shiung Wu's Discovery

The Queen of Nuclear Physics (Part One): Chien-Shiung Wu's Discovery

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Particle and experimental physicist Chien-Shiung Wu. University Archives, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University Libraries hide caption

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University Archives, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University Libraries

Particle and experimental physicist Chien-Shiung Wu.

University Archives, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University Libraries

In the 1950's, a particle physicist made a landmark discovery that changed what was known about how the universe operates. Chien-Shiung Wu did it while raising a family and an ocean away from her relatives in China.

Short Wave's Scientist-In-Residence Regina Barber joins host Emily Kwong to talk about that landmark discovery—what it meant for the physics world, and what it means to Regina personally as a woman and a Chinese and Mexican American in physics.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Berly McCoy, edited by Gisele Grayson and fact checked by Katherine Sypher. The audio engineer was Patrick Murray.