The Queen of Nuclear Physics (Part Two): Forming Chien-Shiung Wu's Story : Short Wave Growing up, Jada Yuan didn't realize how famous her grandmother was in the world of physics. In this episode, Jada talks to Emily about the life of physicist Chien-Shiung Wu, whom Jada got to know much better while writing the article Discovering Dr. Wu for the Washington Post, where she is a reporter covering culture and politics.

Check out part one in which Emily talks to Short Wave's scientist-in-residence about how Chien-Shiung Wu altered physics. She made a landmark discovery in 1956 about how our universe operates at the tiniest levels.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

The Queen of Nuclear Physics (Part Two): Forming Chien-Shiung Wu's Story

The Queen of Nuclear Physics (Part Two): Forming Chien-Shiung Wu's Story

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Jada Yuan with her grandmother, Chien-Shiung Wu. Wu/Yuan family hide caption

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Wu/Yuan family

Jada Yuan with her grandmother, Chien-Shiung Wu.

Wu/Yuan family

Growing up, Jada Yuan didn't realize how famous her grandmother was in the world of physics. In this episode, we delve into the life of physicist Chien-Shiung Wu from her granddaughter's perspective. Jada talks to host Emily Kwong about writing the article Discovering Dr. Wu for the Washington Post, where she is a reporter covering culture and politics.

Check out part one in which Emily talks to Short Wave's scientist-in-residence about how Chien-Shiung Wu altered physics. She made a landmark discovery in 1956 about how our universe operates at the tiniest levels.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org

This episode was produced by Berly McCoy, edited by Gisele Grayson and fact checked by Katherine Sypher. The audio engineer were Josh Newell and Robert Rodriguez.