Can We Stop Mass Shootings Before They Start? : Consider This from NPR In the past two weeks the nation has borne witness to the tragedy of two mass shootings. In Uvalde, Texas, a gunman killed 19 students and their two teachers inside a fourth grade classroom at Robb Elementary School. At least 17 were wounded.

In Buffalo, New York, a man is accused of shooting and killing 10 members of the Black community who were shopping at Tops supermarket. In a long internet screed, he wrote about how online racist ideology and white supremacist conspiracy theories fueled his violence. Witnessing the aftermath of these horrific acts leaves us wondering, once again, what can be done to identify the warning signs of those who plan to commit mass violence—before it's too late?

We speak with Joanna Schroeder about ways to protect young people from being indoctrinated into violent white supremacist groups. Schroeder chronicles her sons' exposure to content from online racist hate groups and how she intervened.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Can We Stop Mass Shootings Before They Start?

Can We Stop Mass Shootings Before They Start?

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Elena Mendoza, 18, on Thursday grieves in front of a cross honoring her cousin, Amerie Jo Garza, one of the victims killed in this week's elementary school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Elena Mendoza, 18, on Thursday grieves in front of a cross honoring her cousin, Amerie Jo Garza, one of the victims killed in this week's elementary school shooting in Uvalde, Texas.

Jae C. Hong/AP

In the past two weeks the nation has borne witness to the tragedy of two mass shootings. In Uvalde, Texas, a gunman killed 19 students and their two teachers inside a fourth grade classroom at Robb Elementary School. At least 17 were wounded.

In Buffalo, New York, a man is accused of shooting and killing 10 members of the Black community who were shopping at Tops supermarket. In a long internet screed, he wrote about how online racist ideology and white supremacist conspiracy theories fueled his violence. Witnessing the aftermath of these horrific acts leaves us wondering, once again, what can be done to identify the warning signs of those who plan to commit mass violence—before it's too late?

We speak with Joanna Schroeder about ways to protect young people from being indoctrinated into violent white supremacist groups. Schroeder chronicles her sons' exposure to content from online racist hate groups and how she intervened.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Eliza Dennis. It was edited by Jeanette Woods. Our executive producer is Natalie Winston.