Warning Vulnerable Populations About Monkeypox Without Stigmatizing Them : Consider This from NPR Many of the people affected by the current global monkeypox outbreak are reported to be men who identify as gay or bisexual, or men who have sex with men.

The virus can affect anyone, but in response to where the majority of cases are, public health officials are gearing their information toward communities of gay and bisexual men. And that has some saying that the messaging echoes back to the HIV/AIDS crisis and has the potential to stigmatize the gay community while missing others who are susceptible to the disease.

We speak with Dr. Boghuma K. Titanji, physician and clinical researcher in infectious diseases at Emory University, about the lessons public health officials can learn from the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 80s and 90s.

And Northwestern University journalism professor Steven Thrasher talks about his recent article for Scientific American, "Blaming Gay Men for Monkeypox Will Harm Everyone."

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Warning Vulnerable Populations About Monkeypox Without Stigmatizing Them

Warning Vulnerable Populations About Monkeypox Without Stigmatizing Them

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A reactive to test suspected monkeypox samples is seen inside a fridge at the microbiology laboratory of La Paz Hospital on June 06, 2022 in Madrid, Spain. Europe is at the centre of the monkeypox virus outbreak, the World Health Organization reported 780 confirmed cases with Britain, Spain and Portugal reporting the largest numbers of patients. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

A reactive to test suspected monkeypox samples is seen inside a fridge at the microbiology laboratory of La Paz Hospital on June 06, 2022 in Madrid, Spain. Europe is at the centre of the monkeypox virus outbreak, the World Health Organization reported 780 confirmed cases with Britain, Spain and Portugal reporting the largest numbers of patients.

Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

Many of the people affected by the current global monkeypox outbreak are reported to be men who identify as gay or bisexual, or men who have sex with men.

The virus can affect anyone, but in response to where the majority of cases are, public health officials are gearing their information toward communities of gay and bisexual men. And that has some saying that the messaging echoes back to the HIV/AIDS crisis and has the potential to stigmatize the gay community while missing others who are susceptible to the disease.

We speak with Dr. Boghuma K. Titanji, physician and clinical researcher in infectious diseases at Emory University, about the lessons public health officials can learn from the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 80s and 90s.

And Northwestern University journalism professor Steven Thrasher talks about his recent article for Scientific American, "Blaming Gay Men for Monkeypox Will Harm Everyone."

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott. It was edited by Jeanette Woods, Michaeleen Doucleff and Vikki Valentine. Our executive producer is Natalie Winston.